Got 40? Building Blocks for Healthy Youth Development

What are Development Assets?

What are the 40 Developmental Assets?

Where does the 40 Assets framework come from?

How do we know this framework is any good?

Who is responsible for building assets in our kids?

Who besides our youth benefit from this?

What is Got40?

How do I get started? (parents)

How do I get started? (everyone)

What are Development Assets?

The Developmental Assets are basic elements that have a great effect on how children and teens grow up, helping them be successful in their lives and avoid getting into trouble. Building blocks for a safe and healthy life.

What are the 40 Developmental Assets?

The 40 Developmental Assets is a framework for helping parents and others build assets in all of the children, infant through teens, in the community. While we all know the importance of food, clothing, and shelter for children and know where to get them, we often don’t know what strengths, values, and qualities are needed, nor how to supply them. The 40 Developmental Assets shows what is needed and how to furnish them.

Where does the 40 Developmental Assets framework come from?

Search Institute, located in Minnesota, has been researching and developing assets for 40 years. It first published a list of 30 developmental assets in 1990. Further research and refinement has led to the current list of 40 Developmental Assets. For more information visit the Search Institute

How do we know this framework is any good?

Search Institute has surveyed over 2 million youths and the results are consistent across ages groups, rural and urban communities, and in different ethnic and religious groups. A young person with more assets is significantly more likely to succeed and the less likely to get into trouble.

Who in Nevada County is responsible for building assets in our young people

Everyone! Parents, extended family members, teachers and other school staff, faith-based communities, business owners and employees, neighbors, law enforcement, youth themselves. All of us.

Who besides our young people benefit from more assets in our youth?

All of us.

What is Got40?

Got40? is the local effort to promote the 40 Developmental Assets in Nevada County. We are non-profit and all presentations and other assistance is free.

How do I get started? (parents)

If you are unfamiliar with the 40 Developmental Assets, go to the Contact Us page and email a request to have a volunteer call you or sign-up for one of our free presentations.

If you are familiar with the 40 Assets, review Basic Asset Building, then print the Checklist.  Using the Checklist, mark each asset you believe your child has. (If you child is 8 or older, print a second copy of the Checklist, and ask your child to mark the assets he or she has.  Then compare the two lists ans discuss the differences.) 

Avoid working on more than one asset at a time and avoid making too large a change all at once.  Start with simple things, like telling each of your children something you like about them every day, making sure you say please and thank you every time it is appropriate, or start a family calendar that notes everyone's activities, including school events, and a message board for all, including you, to say where they are going, with whom, and when returning.  Go to the Contact Us page to request a volunteer to contact you or give you more times for working on an asset. (Coming - many more tips on this web site.)

How do I get started? (everyone)

Go to the Contact Us page and email a request to have a volunteer call you or sign-up for one of our free presentations.

Review Basic Asset Building, and look for ways to incorporate these principles into your school, hobby, play, work, church, or business.

Watch the Introduction to Developmental Assets

The More Asset Building Blocks,
the Greater the Child's Success

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Tips

Tip #5
Caring School Climate
If your child is being bullied, listen carefully and make notes of who, where, when. Praise him or her for talking to you about it, and don't criticize. Then ask officials at your child's school to help.

Tip #17
Creative Activities
Provide opportunites for your child to be creative two or more times per week. Classes or materials and time at home for art, music, drama, pottery, woodworking, sewing. Share your own hobbies.

View More Tips